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Posted by on in Coaching Development

Another year of strength and conditioning is officially in the books. Reflection is always a valuable teacher in advancing ones professional work. It’s a humbling teeter-totter of sorts: a process of realizing how much you still need to learn and reinforcing the fundamentals that stand the test of time. Without further adieu, here are 10 things I learned (both business and coaching) in 2011.

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Posted by on in Youth Strength & Conditioning

I officially played my last game of competitive hockey in March of 2003. I miss the game everyday, but I won’t go out and play recreational hockey to fill the void. It’s not that fact that I work early mornings and late nights and have a business to operate, or the fact that my skill set has vanished faster than my receding hairline. I don’t play because too many players on the ice have an identity crisis! I don’t want “couch potato” Tom, who never played the game in his life, but watches NHL hockey every night on TSN and loves the “rough stuff”, to try to re-live the glory days he never had on me. I just don’t want to be put into a situation where egos and attitudes are involved. No one in recreational hockey is getting paid and no one is making a living on the ice. Bottom line: no one is playing at an elite level! What does this possibly have to do with Strength and Conditioning?

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Posted by on in Programming

Poor educators take difficult material and further obscure the subject. Good teachers can take the same material and package it in a way that all can understand.   There are few Coaches in the Strength and Conditioning industry that fit the mold of “teacher”. Dan John is one of those coaches. Michelangelo once said: “simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” The simplicity Coach John employs is an inspiration to all coaches caught in the world of quick gimmicks, fads, broken promises, Internet “gurus”, armchair trainers, Greek philosophers, unnamed forum posters, and overnight success stories. The quantity of information floating around (much with little substance and big price tags) can make you feel like your running in place sometimes. More often than not that’s exactly what happens in the fitness industry. I recently had the opportunity to hear Coach John lecture the staff of MBSC. His message is a “MUST” for all Coaches looking to fight the food fight.

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Posted by on in Business

There’s a lot of glimmer and sparkle in the fitness industry these days that comes at the expense of substance: Twitter accounts, Facebook pages, YouTube videos, blogs, articles, “likes”, “follows” and every other form of social marketing under the sun. While I certainly don’t blame fellow practitioners for jumping on the social media scene (I have), finding quality information is like mining for gold.  According to Wikipedia: “Gold has been a valuable and highly sought-after precious-metal for coinage, jewelry, and other arts since long before the beginning of recoded history.” In other words, gold is a valuable resource! Fool’s gold on the other hand is very common, so common in fact that in the earth's crust it is found in almost every possible environment, hence it has a vast number of forms and varieties. I believe the same holds true regarding information in the fitness industry. Plenty of resources, but few that hold their value in gold. Below are three ways to mine for gold in the fitness industry.

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Posted by on in Rehabilitation

Contact athletes are exposed to high-end impact forces that affect the entire Kinetic Chain on a daily basis. I have written in the past about the training implications of building “functional hypertrophy” and the demands contact places on the body, in particular the shoulder complex. Without a doubt, the biggest issues we deal with at Donskov Strength and Conditioning during the coarse of the competitive hockey season are shoulder related (AC joint) due to high impact collisions. Keep in mind that we perform a healthy dose of T-Spine mobility; horizontal/vertical pulling and “direct” cuff training in order to prevent these occurrences and we will continue to do so.   However, I am beginning to re-think the volume of horizontal pulling that we incorporate into our programs at DSC. This is a number that will increase in the future and will directly affect the push/pull ratio within our program design.

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