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My older brother Misha has always been a mentor to me.  We share Coaching experiences, feedback and life lessons on a daily basis.  We also share “must reads” in terms of coaching education.  He recently suggested that I read Jon Gordon’s “The Energy Bus” and this book has reinforced why I continue to believe that beneath the confines of our gym lies something truly special!  Beyond the walls of DSC is an electrically charged machine!   An environment that reinforces team first, attitude, attention to detail, respect, adherence, care, concern, transformation, positive energy, and genuine smiles.  We preach to our youth athletes on a daily basis the importance of a positive attitude.  Below is a quick reflection from “The Energy Bus” that reinforces how important attitude is in life!

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Posted by on in Coaching Development

When I think of the story of my father’s childhood I’m often reminded of how lucky I am.  I am also reminded that comparatively speaking, I was a spoiled child.  My father was born in Europe (Belgrade), lived three and a half years in a refugee camp before a Church sponsored the entire family to come by boat to Canada.  They arrived needing to learn a language, make a living and provide for one another.  Nothing was guaranteed, granted or given.  They weren’t worried about rights and privileges; they were concerned with priorities and obligations!  They worked for everything!  Fast-forward to my childhood many years later:  travel hockey, $200 hockey skates, gym memberships, long road trips, unconditional resources, a comfortable house to live in and a language that my peers spoke fluently!  My father has taught me many valuable life lessons as his lens provides a unique perspective on what it means to “earn it”.  During my career as an athlete, student and now as a man, my father had two rules:

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Posted by on in Programming

The role of a strength coach is three fold:  1.) Do No Harm, 2.) Reduce Injury, 3.) Enhance Performance.  With the additional use of several biofeedback markers such as HRV (the state of the autonomic nervous system) and vertical jump (the state of the central nervous system) qualified coaches can more accurately prescribe stress to their respective populations.  There are plenty more markers to utilize, but we use these for convenience/economy in our small and individual groups at DSC.

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Posted by on in Coaching Development

I wish I knew fifteen years ago what I know today.  Not just pertaining to my craft as a Strength Coach, but the valuable life lessons I learned along the way during my career as an athlete!  The importance of realizing inner potential, the necessity of utilizing all resources to their utmost capacity and that “intangibles” are just as important as physical attributes in the journey to success. In fact, the more I look into the process, the more I envision one big assembly line producing specialty vehicles.  The assembly workers (Coaches) ensure that all parts are strategically placed in order for the car (Athlete) to run effectively and efficiently with minimal pit stops.  Each car is different so each worker (Coach) has an important job in the final construction.  Care, concern, and attention to detail are just a few qualities of a good line worker (Coach).  Nobody wants a car that constantly breaks down, is missing an engine or won’t start. 

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Posted by on in Coaching Development

“There is no progress without change, but not all change is progress.”  (Wooden) There have been many advances over the years in the field of strength training: new technology, cutting edge equipment, advanced recovery tools, means, methods, published studies, internet “experts”, technical cuing, progressive motor learning and an ever-changing “ideal” of the perfect program.  With all of these variables, have we forgotten the Coach?  After all who is it that controls them?  Which means, methods, equipment, and recovery need to be used under differing circumstances?  Most importantly, who has the ability to change lives through discipline, motivation and realization of potential? 

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