DSC Blog

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.

Coaching Development

Content aimed to assist strength coaches and fitness professionals to become a leader in the industry.

Posted by on in Coaching Development

I recently received a text message from my older brother (a current assistant coach in the Ontario Hockey League), outlining his philosophy on leaving a legacy behind. One powerful line stood out and made me think of what it means to aspire in reaching the ultimate goal of one’s inner potential: He said “I try and get one day better everyday!” One day better everyday, a small yet achievable goal centered on work ethic, pride, attention to detail, sacrifice, perseverance, initiative, self-control, confidence and competitive greatness.

...
Last modified on

Experience is a valuable teacher, arguably the single most important step in the learning process. Learning from past success and failure allows us to build efficient, effective training methods, exercise components, philosophies, coaching cues, professional, hands-on knowledge, and most importantly saves time. “Time is of essence, and the essence of success is time.” (John Wooden) There are many avoidable mistakes young coaches make to form their experiences: from the muscle head coach who creates his workout regime from a Bodybuilding Magazine, to the Coach who tries to fit square pegs in round holes and hurts his clients or himself, to the Coach that thinks a former sporting career qualifies him as a competent, effective strength and conditioning professional. The question we all need to ask ourselves is: “Can we expedite the learning process?” “Can we learn from wise coaches with years of experience making mistakes so that we may avoid them?” The answer to this question is YES! I call this Fast Forward Learning.

...
Last modified on

Posted by on in Coaching Development

During my days as a youth, I was never a big fan of visiting the doctors’ office. Just the sight of a white coat made my heart race faster than a pace car at the Indianapolis 500. Maybe it was the fear of getting a shot, or the doctor asking me to turn and cough, either way you cut it, I had white coat syndrome! Fast forward to the present and my profession as a Strength and Conditioning Coach. The best coaches in the business use evidence based practice, meshing research with practical application to form safe, and effective protocol for their respective populations. Research however is a touchy subject. What journals are considered “credible”? How old is the study? What population was used to prove/disprove a theory? Does the study classify a “group” and not individualize certain characteristics (i.e. weight, height, age, lifestyle, sport career, previous injury, level of exercise, ect)? The list goes on and on! Research/Evidence is very important, and with all if this information at hand, many Coaches can get white coat syndrome (overwhelmed and hesitant to proceed).

...
Last modified on

...
Last modified on

I don’t like comparing sports or strength and conditioning to war.It’s an insult to our fine service men and women that sacrifice their lives in order for us to do what we do.This is far more important than goals, assists, touchdowns and turnovers.I do however, find they’re ranking system fascinating and think we as aspiring coaches can learn from these brave soldiers.Rank is based on EXPERIENCE! You don’t start out as a general; you put in countless hours (early mornings, late nights) as a foot soldier learning from high-ranking commanders and executing pre set commands.You spend trench time making mistakes. You spend trench time using two ears and one mouth.You spend trench time learning and applying.You spend trench gaining valuable experience.You spend trench time in hostile situations.You spend trench time gaining the respect of your fellow soldiers and leaders. This is how you earn your stripes.It’s a continuous process, a pursuit of excellence that takes many, many years to accomplish.What does this possibly have to do with strength and conditioning you may ask?It has everything to do with it!

...
Last modified on
Follow Us