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Programming

Content specific to exercise protocol and design.

The sport of hockey is extremely demanding.  Players reaching speeds of up to 30mph is the equivalent of hundreds of small car crashes occurring throughout the course of a 7-8 month season.  Physiological, psychological and mechanical stressors mount during this time.  It is during this period that the strength and conditioning practitioner faces a major challenge; the law of competing demands; In other words, how to balance stress so that players performs optimally when it matters most on the ice.  This job changes during the off-season when the major stressors of competition are removed.  The off-season, although often limited in time, is paramount in terms of physical preparation and the application of additional stressors that may not be appropriate during the period of intense competition. 

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Advanced Periodization & Team Sports

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We have had the unique experience of training multiple populations at DSC.  Although hockey is our niche, we have had the opportunity to train a diverse number of field sport athletes, motor sport athletes, and most recently Olympic caliber freestyle wrestlers.  Our goal for all populations, regardless of sport, is to provide a safe working environment and deliver tangible RESULTS!  Bottom line, we are not “married” to one-way of doing things.  We are “married” to best practice. 

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There have been several instances in the past where we have had guests visit DSC to watch us train our athletes in large group settings.  Many times Coaches will comment after the session about our plyometric component of program design.   “Those aren’t true plyometrics are they?” and I will indeed nod my head in agreement.  True plyometrics seek to take advantage of the Stretch Shortening Cycle using elastic energy stored in the tendons.  This is accomplished with minimal transition time (.15-.20 seconds) between eccentric stretch and rapid concentric contraction.  In other words, minimal ground contact!  A quick stretch excites the muscle spindles (which act as neuromuscular stimulators communicating with the brain telling it how hard it must contract a muscle to overcome a load).  We do progress our “jump training” into true plyometrics, but we don’t start there. 

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The role of a strength coach is three fold:  1.) Do No Harm, 2.) Reduce Injury, 3.) Enhance Performance.  With the additional use of several biofeedback markers such as HRV (the state of the autonomic nervous system) and vertical jump (the state of the central nervous system) qualified coaches can more accurately prescribe stress to their respective populations.  There are plenty more markers to utilize, but we use these for convenience/economy in our small and individual groups at DSC.

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