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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in Donskov Strength and Conditioning

Posted by on in Youth Strength & Conditioning

Iron deficiency is a condition resulting from too little iron in the body.  I’m not talking anemia, hemoglobin, red meat or oxygen transport; I’m talking about barbells, dumbbells, and free weights.  I can’t tell you how many conversations I’ve had with parents who are concerned that young 13-year-old Tommy who plays hockey, one of the most physically intimidating, bone crunching sports in the world is concerned that weight training may cause adverse effects.  Never mind that young Tommy is built like a coat hanger, can’t fight his way out of a wet paper bag and that the organized chaotic demands of hockey stress a young body far more than a well organized, structured strength and conditioning program.  This leads to a condition I refer to as Iron Deficiency.  Iron deficiency is a dangerous condition where the musculoskeletal system is not prepared to meet the demands of the stress imposed on it.  It affects a large majority of the youth population who spend the summer’s playing Nintendo, running long distances, and engaging in non-external resistance training such as boxing, MMA and Insanity.

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I am convinced that if you want something bad enough, you have to roll up your sleeves, buckle up your chin strap and be prepared to scratch, claw and grind for every inch of greatness you can attain before it’s too late.  All athletic careers have expiration dates!  You have to be ALL IN! There is no “I think I’ll go play Nintendo today” or “I’ll just have Mom and Dad say I’m not feeling well”, or “I don’t feel like rehab today on my injury” at the elite level.  You’re either all in OR your all gone!  Recently “rare air” has been attained at DSC as three of our elite athletes have attained Championships at the International and National Levels respectively:  Lisa Chesson (USA Women’s National Hockey Team World Champion), Connor Murphy (USA World Junior Hockey Gold Medalist), and Keith Gavin (USA 84KG Freestyle Wrestling Champion).  To say that we are proud would be an understatement.  They embody what it means to be “ALL IN”.  Yes, they all have great genetics, BUT more importantly, they are “Everydayers”!  Their work ethic and drive matches their attitude and desire to get better, get stronger, listen to their bodies, rest, recover, regenerate, and attain “consistent greatness”.   Weather it’s focusing on lifting heavy weight, breathing patters, diet, rehabbing an injury or getting more sleep, they spend just as much time “working in” as they do “working out.”   Bottom line: they are prepared! 

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Posted by on in Coaching Development

“There is no progress without change, but not all change is progress.”  (Wooden) There have been many advances over the years in the field of strength training: new technology, cutting edge equipment, advanced recovery tools, means, methods, published studies, internet “experts”, technical cuing, progressive motor learning and an ever-changing “ideal” of the perfect program.  With all of these variables, have we forgotten the Coach?  After all who is it that controls them?  Which means, methods, equipment, and recovery need to be used under differing circumstances?  Most importantly, who has the ability to change lives through discipline, motivation and realization of potential? 

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Posted by on in Coaching Development

DSC is pleased to announce the release of our new Athletic Development/Sports Performance video.  This video details our training philosophy, training environment, exercise protocol and coaching style.  We take pride in providing unparalleled strength and conditioning services in a safe, team oriented atmosphere.  We believe in work ethic, attention to detail, commitment, determination and accountability.  Educated, caring Coaches fueled with passion for exercise protocol, make DSC an ideal environment for athletes of all ages.  Welcome to DSC!

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Posted by on in Programming

At Donskov Strength and Conditioning we have the unique opportunity of training athletes of various training ages (Beginner, intermediate and advanced athletes’ populate our programs).  As our business has grown over the years, so too has the number of athletes’ considered intermediate/advanced (4-5 training years) based on experience and years “under the bar”.  With this demographic, comes different programming variables.  No longer can these athletes make gains with progressive overload by simply adding 5 pounds to each side of the bar.  The load needs to fluctuate and “wave” allowing for periods of brief intensity coupled with periods of lighter dosing.  Our waves at DSC are three weeks in length with total volume dropping 40-50% in the final week to “realize gains” and stay fresh.  Here is how a single wave may work:

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Posted by on in Programming

According to the dictionary a machine is “an apparatus using or applying mechanical power and having several parts, each with a definite function and together performing a particular task.” Strength and conditioning programming is a “machine!”  It has multiple moving, adjustable, parts all working to enhance performance, reduce sport injury and provide measurable gains for the athlete/client.  From my experience, the best machines are the easiest to use!

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Posted by on in Programming

I’m a sucker for strength training information: from Eastern Block methodologies (Verkhoshansky, Issurin, Bondarchuck, Roman, Drabik and Medvedyev), to Westside Methods (Louie Simmons), and Tommy Kono’s Olympic lifting information.  A plethora of excellent resources exist for the strength and conditioning professional.  Amongst all the resources, data, personal bias, and program layout, a few questions need to be answered prior to commencing the training process:

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Another year has passed in the confines of the weight room.  A time for Strength Coaches to look back on gains, set backs, dos, don’ts, attitudes, dreams and life experiences.  It may be filled with free weight, chalk and sweat but the more I think about it, the weight room is more of a life-sized classroom that every youngster should experience.  For inside I have learned more than any textbook has ever taught me.  The value of hard work, attention to detail, sacrifice, paying dues, persistence, positivity, courage, team work, discipline, determination, dedication, adaptation, programming, methodologies in practice, what works, what doesn’t and BELIEF!  The most rewarding is belief!  A young athlete that gains confidence and believes in himself/herself through training is more rewarding than PR’s, weight pulled and record boards.  My goal for 2013 is that more people can experience this atmosphere, this magic, this special place where work meets reward, where passion meets persistence, where pride meets iron, where life lessons are ingrained in the fabric of our being for the rest of our lives, the weight room!  I hope 2013 brings more to experience this classroom.

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A system in “neutral” is desirable for physical activity.  It allows for efficient, alternating, reciprocal function in performing daily and sporting activities.   In other words, great fuel mileage with less wear and tear in the long run.  Taking the car analogy one step further, what would happen if we didn’t have neutrality, if we drove for miles and miles with our tires out of alignment?  Chances are we would end up on the side of the road sooner or later.  Well, our bodies are not designed for “neutrality”.  As humans our thorax, along with vital organs are different from right to left.  This affects our “alignment” and may cause us to use our fuel (a.k.a. oxygen) inefficiently.  Lets take a look at these differences.

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Posted by on in Programming

Sequence: A strict order of succession. Although there are a plethora of programming variables (training age, motor priorities, sport, exercise selection, exercise order, tempo, rest, intensity, density, duration, frequency, regeneration) it seems like the art of sequencing has taken a back burner.  There are two forms of sequencing that we use at Donskov Strength and Conditioning when writing our programs, small picture and big picture sequencing. We aim to keep things simple.

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